2 Major Avenues For Paying for College

2 Different Avenues to Pay for College

Paying for College

In midsummer many people are preparing to move to college in the next few weeks and colleges are preparing the financial packages for new and returning students.   As many media outlets have covered and as many college students and parents know – college is expensive. There are several avenues to pay for college. Two ways to consider are federal financial aid and the tax-advantaged 529 Plans which were expanded with the new tax laws..

Federal Financial Aid

For the federal government to determine your child's financial aid eligibility, you must first complete its aid application known as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The FAFSA requires specific income and asset information from both you and your child. Independent students do not need to list their parents' information.

A specific formula is then applied that results in a figure known as the expected family contribution, or EFC. This figure is the amount of money your family must contribute to college costs for the year before the federal government awards any financial aid. The difference between the cost of attendance at your child's college and your EFC is your child's financial need.

The federal government notifies you of the amount of your EFC in a document known as the Student Aid Report, or SAR. The SAR is also sent to the colleges that your child has applied to. When your child is accepted at a college, the financial aid administrator at that school attempts to create a financial aid package that will meet your child's financial need. The package will include various combinations of loans, grants, scholarships, and work-study programs, from both the government and the college. If appropriate, you will be given further information on where to apply for various loan programs.

If you're lucky, your child's financial aid package will meet all of his or her financial need. However, colleges aren't obligated to do so. If a college doesn't meet 100% of your child's financial need, you are responsible for meeting this shortfall. In some cases, you may be able to present special personal or financial circumstances to the financial aid administrator in an attempt to increase your child's aid award.

529 Plans Expanded

The new law expands the definition of 529 plan “qualified education expenses" to include K-12 tuition. Starting in 2018, annual withdrawals of up to $10,000 per student can be made from a 529 college savings plan for tuition expenses related to enrollment at a K-12 public, private, or religious school (excluding home schooling). Such withdrawals are now tax-free at the federal level.

The expansion of 529 plans may impact Coverdell Education Savings Accounts (ESAs). Coverdell ESAs let families save up to $2,000 per year for a child's K-12 or college expenses. Up until now, they were the only option for tax-advantaged K-12 savings. But now the use of Coverdell ESAs may decline as parents are likely to prefer the much higher lifetime contribution limits of 529 plans — generally $350,000 and up — over the $2,000 annual limit for Coverdell accounts. In addition, Coverdell ESA contributions can only be made for children under age 18.

Coverdell ESAs do have one important advantage over 529 plans, though: investment flexibility. Coverdell owners have a wide variety of options in terms of what investments they hold in their accounts, and may generally change investments as often as they wish. By contrast, 529 account owners can invest only in the investment portfolios offered by the plan, and they can change their existing plan investments only twice per year.

In addition, the new tax law allows 529 account owners to roll over (transfer) funds from a 529 account to an ABLE account without federal tax consequences if certain requirements are met. An ABLE account is a tax-advantaged account that can be used to save for disability-related expenses for individuals who become blind or disabled before age 26. Like 529 plans, ABLE plans allow funds to accumulate tax deferred, and withdrawals are tax-free when used for a qualified expense.

Need more information?
Set Up A Complimentary Discovery Call with Doug by clicking HERE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *